Descriptive Title:

Percent of adults, living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level, who are unable to consistently afford enough food

Geographic Unit of Analysis:

County

Why Is This An Indicator Of Health and Sustainability?

 

Good nutrition provides key building blocks for growth, repair, and maintenance of our bodies. Breastfeeding protects against infant illness and death and is associated with improved life-long health outcomes. Good nutrition can be a remedy for many of today’s common problems, such as stress, depression, the effects of pollution, lack of stamina, and sexual dysfunction. It can prevent and help treat obesity, acute illness, and the leading causes of preventable hospitalization and early death. 
Poor nutrition, for example a diet low in fruit and vegetables and high in fast food and soda, is associated with weight gain, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and cancer.8 Dehydration due to inadequate water intake frequently results in what is considered to be preventable hospitalization.9
Limited access to healthy food choices is directly correlated to obesity and diabetes, which occur at higher rates among people living in low-income communities with more restricted food environments.10

Good nutrition provides key building blocks for growth, repair, and maintenance of our bodies.  Good nutrition can be a remedy for many of today’s common problems, such as stress, depression, the effects of pollution, lack of stamina, and sexual dysfunction. It can prevent and help treat obesity, acute illness, and the leading causes of preventable hospitalization and early death. Poor nutrition, for example a diet low in fruit and vegetables and high in fast food and soda, is associated with weight gain, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and cancer.a Dehydration due to inadequate water intake frequently results in what is considered to be preventable hospitalization.b Limited access to healthy food choices is directly correlated to obesity and diabetes, which occur at higher rates among people living in low-income communities with more restricted food environments.c

Interpretation and Geographic Equity Analysis

While there appears to be moderate variation across years, this is not statistically significant. However, we can ascertain that roughly 20-45% of low-income adults cannot afford enough food on a routine basis.

Methods

Data was pulled from AskCHIS.com and charted.

Limitations

The California Health Interview Survey is sample survey, and this annual numbers are estimates. Variation from year to year, may not be indicative of significant change. Additionally, starting in 2012, CHIS changed its methodology to conduct rolling surveying (instead of odd years) so numbers should be interpreted with caution.

Data Source

Food security data pulled from the California Health Interview Survey, available here: http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/Pages/AskCHIS.aspx

Map and tables prepared by City and County of San Francisco, Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Branch using ArcGIS software.

Detailed information regarding census data, geographic units of analysis, their definitions, and their boundaries can be found at the following links:

Interactive boundaries map

http://sfindicatorproject.org/resources/data_map_methods

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Caloric Intake from Fast Food Among Adults: United States, 2007-2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db114.htm

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Caloric Intake from Fast Food Among Adults: 
    United States, 2007-2010. 
    http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db11Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Caloric Intake from Fast Food Among Adults: United States, 2007-2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db114.htm
  2. Moy E, Chang E, Barrett M., “Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations — United States, 2001 – 2009.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (2013); 62(03):1391–143. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6203a23.htm

    Moy E, Chang E, Barrett M., “Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations — United States, 2001 – 2009.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (2013); 62(03):1391–143. 
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6203a23.h
  3. Department of Public Health, City and County of San Francisco, The San Francisco Indicator Project.” http://www.sfindicatorproject.org/indicators/view/116