Descriptive Title:

Curb ramp distribution

Geographic Unit of Analysis:

Intersection

Curb ramp distribution (2015)
NeighborhoodTotal intersectionsIntersections with ramp recorded by DPWPercent of intersections with curb ramps
Bayview/Hunter's Point 811 529 65.20%
Bernal Heights 393 306 77.90%
Castro/Upper Market 230 196 85.20%
Chinatown 156 121 77.60%
Excelsior 338 285 84.30%
Financial District/South Beach 331 252 76.10%
Glen Park 138 116 84.10%
Golden Gate Park 132 117 88.60%
Haight Ashbury 119 112 94.10%
Hayes Valley 133 121 91.00%
Inner Richmond 112 101 90.20%
Inner Sunset 250 188 75.20%
Japantown 29 26 89.70%
Lakeshore 159 127 79.90%
Lincoln Park 20 7 35.00%
Lone Mountain/USF 132 121 91.70%
Marina 211 185 87.70%
McLaren Park 28 22 78.60%
Mission 472 413 87.50%
Mission Bay 135 90 66.70%
Nob Hill 168 134 79.80%
Noe Valley 207 180 87.00%
North Beach 202 141 69.80%
Oceanview/Merced/Ingleside 243 197 81.10%
Outer Mission 324 248 76.50%
Outer Richmond 247 242 98.00%
Pacific Heights 155 146 94.20%
Portola 208 164 78.80%
Potrero Hill 233 172 73.80%
Presidio 320 8 2.50%
Presidio Heights 103 91 88.30%
Russian Hill 184 142 77.20%
San Francisco 9,305 7,155 76.90%
Seacliff 50 38 76.00%
South of Market 268 207 77.20%
Sunset/Parkside 620 606 97.70%
Tenderloin 129 106 82.20%
Treasure Island 147 0 0.00%
Twin Peaks 136 71 52.20%
Visitacion Valley 168 132 78.60%
West of Twin Peaks 722 579 80.20%
Western Addition 142 116 81.70%

Why Is This An Indicator Of Health and Sustainability?

For individuals with mobility issues, parents using strollers, or shoppers using utility carts, curb ramps are essential for independent travel, providing an accessible path onto and off of public sidewalks to public facilities, accommodations, transportation, shopping districts, health care facilities, etc. Because of this, the Access Compliance Section of the Office of the State Architect and State Department of Rehabilitation developed Title 24 Part II which is a building code specifying the requirements for making, among other things, sidewalks and intersections accessible. All City departments and private contractors doing work adjacent to angular curb returns are required to construct curb ramps according to Public Works standards and construction specifications which incorporate both federal and state disability construction codes. Unfortunately, not all curb ramps in San Francisco have been modified to meet these requirements and individuals traveling through neighborhoods lacking accessible curb ramps are at risk for injury when trying to cross at intersections with high curbs, or may be less likely to use active transportation to get to and from their destinations. 

Interpretation and Geographic Equity Analysis

Overall, 77% of intersections in San Francisco have at least one curb ramp. The neighborhood with the lowest presence of curb ramps is Treasure Island, which has no curb ramps among its 147 intersections. Other neighborhoods with low curb ramp coverage include: Presidio, Lincoln Park, Twin Peaks, and Bayview/Hunters Point, wich all have 65% or fewer intersections with ramps. Conversely, Outer Richmond and Sunset/Parkside, both have 98% of intersections with at least one curb ramp. Other neighborhoods that also have 90% or more intersections with curb ramps include: Pacific Heights, Haight Ashbury, Lone Mountain/USF, Hayes Valley, and Inner Richmond.

The presence of curb ramps is likely influenced by the volume of constuction that has taken place in neighborhoods. As DPW's curb ramp program states: "All City departments and private contractors doing work adjacent to angular curb returns are required to construct curb ramps according to Public Works standards and construction specifications which incorporate both federal and state disability construction codes." http://www.sfpublicworks.org/curbrampprogram

Methods

Curb ramp data was obtained from the DPW curb ramp program and was mapped. Intersections with as least one ramp, were shaded green.

Limitations

A standard four leg intersection would ideally have eight crub ramps (two for each crosswalk). However some intersections do not allow pedestrian crossing on all legs, due to safety concerns (examples include Fell St. & Gough St. and Franklin St. & Oak St.). Because of this challenge definining an accurate denominator for the number of curb ramps, this indicator does not illustrate the degree to which intersections are complete, with all necessary curb ramps in place.  This indicator only illustrates whether an intersection has at least one curb ramp.

Data Source

Curb ramp and intersection data from the Department of Public Works, 2015.

Table data is presented by analysis neighborhood.

Detailed information regarding census data, geographic units of analysis, their definitions, and their boundaries can be found at the following links:

Interactive boundaries map

http://sfindicatorproject.org/resources/data_map_methods