Descriptive Title: Proportion of households that own their home

Geographic Unit of Analysis: Census tract

Proportion of households that own their home (2010)
Neighborhood% Owners
Bayview/Hunter's Point 49%
Bernal Heights 54%
Castro/Upper Market 38%
Chinatown 5%
Excelsior 63%
Financial District/South Beach 15%
Glen Park
Golden Gate Park NA
Haight Ashbury 30%
Hayes Valley
Inner Richmond 33%
Inner Sunset 39%
Japantown
Lakeshore 31%
Lincoln Park
Lone Mountain/USF
Marina 24%
McLaren Park
Mission 22%
Mission Bay
Nob Hill 14%
Noe Valley 48%
North Beach 23%
Oceanview/Merced/Ingleside
Outer Mission 63%
Outer Richmond 39%
Pacific Heights 27%
Portola
Potrero Hill 47%
Presidio 3%
Presidio Heights 38%
Russian Hill 22%
San Francisco 36%
Seacliff 62%
South of Market 27%
Sunset/Parkside
Tenderloin
Treasure Island 0%
Twin Peaks 43%
Visitacion Valley 56%
West of Twin Peaks 85%
Western Addition 20%

Why Is This An Indicator Of Health and Sustainability?

Similar to rent burdened households, households spending a high percentage of their income on a mortgage have a smaller percentage of income to spend on other necessities such as food, heating, transportation, health care, and child care and very little, if any, savings for emergency situations, children's future tuition or retirement. Although a mortgage can be a financial burden, home ownership does provide multiple benefits to its owners including increased tax benefits, collateral for financial emergencies, and opportunities for wealth creation. Home ownership is also associated with increased residential stability, and benefits homeowners by providing a setting for expression of identity and control. This catalyzes a personal investment in home maintenance, neighborhood improvement, and community cohesion.

For additional information on the connections between housing and health, visit: The Case for Housing Impacts Assessment by SFDPH, Program on Health Equity and Sustainability.a

Interpretation and Geographic Equity Analysis

These maps illustrate the proportion of owner-occupied housing units at the census tract level; the table presents data aggregated at the neighborhood level.  Neighborhoods in the south western portion of San Francisco have much higher percentages of owner occupied housing. The West of Twin Peaks neighborhood has the highest percentage of owner occupied housing (85%). Conversely, the north eastern neighborhoods of San Francisco have much lower home ownership rates. The neighborhoods with the lowest home ownership include: Treasure Island, Presidio, Downtown/Civic Center, Chinatown, and Nob Hill. The Presidio and Treasure Island are unique neighborhoods in San Francisco because they were historically military posts but is now offer leasing opportunities in the former military housing; thus, there are limited, if any, opportunities for home ownership. 
According to the National Association of Realtors' 2012 Quarterly Report for the 1st quarter, the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont metropolitan area has the fourth highest average single family home price in the nation ($448,000) in 2012, after Honolulu ($616,700), the nearby area of San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara ($535,500), and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine metropolitan area ($484,900). This average is almost three times greater than the national average ($157,000).
Between 1996 and 2000, the average home purchase price doubled, primarily the result of booming dot-com and housing economies in San Francisco and surrounding areas, as well as a shortage affordable housing construction. The San Francisco Mayor's Office of Housing notes that despite the availability of lower rate mortgages to first-time home buyers, the high cost of housing in San Francisco makes home ownership beyond the reach of most San Franciscans.

These maps illustrate the proportion of owner-occupied housing units at the census tract level; the table presents data aggregated at the neighborhood level.  Neighborhoods in the south western portion of San Francisco have much higher percentages of owner occupied housing. The West of Twin Peaks neighborhood has the highest percentage of owner occupied housing (85%). Conversely, the north eastern neighborhoods of San Francisco have much lower home ownership rates. The neighborhoods with the lowest home ownership include: Treasure Island, Presidio, Downtown/Civic Center, Chinatown, and Nob Hill. The Presidio and Treasure Island are unique neighborhoods in San Francisco because they were historically military posts but is now offer leasing opportunities in the former military housing; thus, there are limited, if any, opportunities for home ownership. 

According to the National Association of Realtors' 2012 Quarterly Report for the 1st quarter, the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont metropolitan area has the fourth highest average single family home price in the nation ($448,000) in 2012, after Honolulu ($616,700), the nearby area of San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara ($535,500), and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine metropolitan area ($484,900). This average is almost three times greater than the national average ($157,000).

Between 1996 and 2000, the average home purchase price doubled, primarily the result of booming dot-com and housing economies in San Francisco and surrounding areas, as well as a shortage affordable housing construction. The San Francisco Mayor's Office of Housing notes that despite the availability of lower rate mortgages to first-time home buyers, the high cost of housing in San Francisco makes home ownership beyond the reach of most San Franciscans.

Methods

The proportion of owner-occupied housing units was calculated by dividing the total number of owner-occupied housing units by the total number of occupied units in that neighborhood. The proportion of renter-occupied housing units was calculated by dividing the total number of renter-occupied housing units by the total number of occupied units in that neighborhood.

SF DPH used ArcGIS software and a 'centroids within' methodology to convert census tracts to geographic mean center points. We then assigned census tracts to planning neighborhoods based on the spatial location of those geographic mean center points and calculated the planning neighborhood totals for the table.

Data Source

2010 US Census.

Map and table created by San Francisco Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Section using ArcGIS software.

Map data is presented at the level of the census tract.. The map also includes planning neighborhood names, in the vicinity of their corresponding census tracts.

Table data is presented by planning neighborhood. While planning neighborhoods are larger geographic areas than census tracts, census tracts do not always lie completely within a planning neighborhood. SFDPH used ArcGIS software and a dasymetric mapping technique to attribute Census block group data to residential lots. We then assigned residential lots to planning neighborhoods to calculate Census population totals within the neighborhoods.

Detailed information regarding census data, geographic units of analysis, their definitions, and their boundaries can be found at the following links:

Interactive boundaries map

http://sfindicatorproject.org/resources/data_map_method

  1. SFDPH. The Case for Housing Impacts Assessment: The Humean Health and Social Impacts of Inadequate Housing and their Consideration in CEQA Policy and Practice. May 2004. Accesible at: http://www.sfhealthequity.org/component/jdownloads/summary/6-housing/136-the-case-for-housing-impacts-assessment?Itemid=62